Concept of Merona

July 27, 2015

I wasn’t sure if I wanted to post this sketch of Merona, as it doesn’t seem to capture her personality the way I feel the first concept sketch did. But I still like it enough to share, and outfit-wise, it is a lot closer to my final design for the character. Plus it’s the first sketch of Merona with her dog that I did. He’s a lot bigger here than I plan on having him, and his face isn’t really at all how I picture him now. But that’s why it’s called a concept sketch. Right?

Merona2

One thing I noticed recently about my character and her design, was that before I had even written the first scene of my story, I had my initial sketch completed, and from that first image my lead was wearing her hat and hefty scarf, and was carrying rope, a rifle, and machete. I didn’t know how the story would go, or what she would need, but these few pieces of equipment and clothing just seemed a part of her character. And they looked useful enough to me, a survival non-expert.

As I wrote, I found my lead making her way around obstacles by utilizing these basic items in ways I hadn’t planned ahead for. Her hat, to me, looked cool, and seemed like nothing more than a guard against the elements, but in one instance it’s used as a makeshift bucket. Her stylish scarf was actually useful to filter bad air, or wrap up an injury. The rifle? Obviously for all those shootouts I never anticipated. The rope, which I had always seen as a lasso, became one of the most versatile items in her arsenal. And her machete? Well let’s just say, I thought she would use it to clear away pesky vines… not the other things she does with it.

In the end it was as if Merona herself had selected her attire and equipment, not me, because she knew exactly what kinds of things she typically ran into in her day to day job. It might have been easier for me, as the almighty writer, to just add to her arsenal to fit future situations, but I liked the way, with just a few items, she seemed to have things more or less covered. Naturally, I added a few things I pictured her carrying in her pockets that weren’t in my initial sketches; a lighter, dynamite, a rag to clean her gun. But I’m sure she would have figured things out even without my little additions.

She was one of those characters that seemed to know exactly who she was before I ever did. And to be honest, those are the characters I find myself most eager to write. The ones that seem to be alive before I’ve breathed life into them. The ones I feel like I’m uncovering, rather than creating.

Giving Things Character

July 11, 2015

You’ve met my lead, now meet the team. Giving no names (at least not yet) we have (from right to lift) the doctor, the pilot, the loyal dog, the adventuress, the financier, and the linguist.

The Team

When I was first formulating my story, I immediately began to craft its cast of characters. Because for me characters are one of, if not the most important thing in a story. They determine, with their personality and principles, how each scene of the story will play out, and they are what the reader will, hopefully, relate most to.

I started to craft them as both a team, making sure that their characteristics were compatible yet distinct from one another, but also (and more importantly) as individuals. One by one, I set about determining what they would sound like, look like, act like, and what they would bring to the team.

Character1

The Adventuress was not only my lead character, but also my team’s leader, and as such needed a strong personality to keep everyone in line. Though that’s not to say she needed to be a people person. She was a tough, blunt, no-nonsense woman of action, and though her team didn’t have to like her, they would have to listen to her. At least most of the time.

Perhaps it had to do with the fact that she had been forming in my head long before the story ever had, but I very naturally felt she would have a weariness about her that the other characters might not. She was the veteran of the team and all her thrill for discovery had long since vanished. Her life of adventure and treasure hunting had turned to a menial job of virtual tedium. And I felt it suited her nicely.

Character2

The Loyal Dog, for me, was a no-brainer. Of course my adventuress would have a scruffy mutt at her side. I mean, what story isn’t improved by a dog? He could warn the team of impending danger that only his keen ears could detect; he could distract the enemy to give his master the upper hand in a fight, but more importantly, he would bring out my surly protagonist’s softer side whenever she interacted with him.

Character3

The Pilot had been floating around in my mind almost as long as my adventuress had, and as a character he was very clear and straightforward. He was a Russian mountain of a man, had a mustache, was a pilot, and as a matter of principle he never, ever, crashed. He would be my leading lady’s old friend and second in command. And though the two could function as a well-oiled machine when needed, they would also contrast each other in many ways.

He would take great pride in his work, she would be in it for the money. He would never hit a woman, she would hit anyone who deserved it. He would be the strength, she would have the cunning. He would be her foil, and she would be his. They could stand side by side, with their differences and similarities, without detracting from the other’s strengths.

Character4

The Linguist was a character of many facets and skills, but mainly seemed to fill the role of peacemaker amid a team of conflicting personalities. She was there to make things run smoothly, when anyone would listen to her. She was clean, poised, and feminine, yet physically adept and logical. She served as a secondary foil, contrasting my pilot and filling the feminine side of things to highlight my lead’s rougher edges.

Character5

The Financier was originally a rich couple, who wished to find adventure in their declining years of life. But for the sake of conserving detail, and characters, they were merged into one, very excitable, aristocrat. Her unquenchable desire for excitement would fuel the adventure. She was, after all, funding the whole thing, so it only followed that she should be passionate about it. Plus there seemed to be little drawback to including an elderly lady thrill-seeker in the tale. On the contrary, it opened up a world of possibilities as a writer.

Character6

The Doctor was a necessity in that the team would suffer injury, and someone needed to patch them up. But her character needed to be more than that. She needed to be an individual, with a distinct personality that would play against the other members of the team. Looking over my other characters, I realized I lacked a voice of reason to point out all the over-the-top craziness that was going on and flat out say “This is insane!” and my physician seemed the perfect character to fill that role. She would be thin, bespectacled, and highly phobic of the world around her as a result of her extensive medical knowledge.

After fleshing out my team as individuals, I looked over them as a whole and realized something… there were four women and only one man. Instinctively I started looking over my characters to decide who would make the switch from female to male to even things out, but almost the moment I started to ponder the conundrum, I couldn’t help but think, “Why? Why can’t my cast be predominantly female?” That was, after all, how I pictured them as individual characters, and had the lopsidedness gone in the other direction, I doubt I would have batted an eyelash.

I think my kneejerk reaction came from a desire to NOT write some sort of feminist-statement book. Which predominant female stories inevitably seem to become. I don’t like stories that set out to make a point in spite of how clunky it might make the narrative. I wanted it to be a fun, lighthearted adventure book. Not a lecture on gender politics. But I decided that just because the cast was mostly women, didn’t mean it had to be a book for only women. They were a team of quirky characters, with differing perspectives, personalities, and a wide range of skills, who just happened to be female.

The story was set in the mid-30s, and so it seemed to require some simple reasoning for why the team was lopsided in an unconventional way for the time. But being that I already had an unconventional elderly adrenaline-junky financing the quest, I figured a small addition to her eccentricities of insisting on hiring all women, would be a simple and effective answer to the question. My team could remain as I had originally envisioned them, and my story could continue as planned.

A Glimpse of Adventure

June 15, 2015

You’ve met Merona Grant (and if you haven’t, you should), and though for the time being I’ve put my writing edits on her story on hold (so I can go back with fresh eyes later), I’ve been plugging away at sketching in some of the interior concept art for her upcoming adventure. And well… I thought I should give everyone a glimpse of just one of the pieces I’ve done so far.

Merona,Art1

Intrigued? Good.

I had contemplated talking all about this picture… who’s in it, where they are, and what chapter it will feature in within the novel. But then I thought, “Nah.” A picture’s worth a thousand words, right? I’ll just let it speak for itself. I mean, it seems pretty clear what it’s trying to say.

Meet Merona Grant

June 5, 2015

I’ve been working on a little story (which has slowly, and against my will, turned into a big story) for a while now, and I thought it was about time I introduced its heroine to the world.

Meet Merona Grant. Adventuress, and treasure hunter for hire, with a predisposition for receiving black eyes, and a rifle which she keeps cleaner than she keeps herself.

Merona1

This sketch is one of the first I ever did of my leading lady, and though her final design differs quite a bit from this one, this image was what stood as my main visual inspiration while writing the initial draft of my story.

So, who is Merona you ask? Oh, you didn’t? Well, I’ll tell you anyway. Merona is the adventuring heroine I’ve been waiting to read about since I was… let me think… like nine years old. She’s as straight shooting with her words, as she is with her gun, can handle herself in a scrape (even if she herself gets scraped up in the process), hates bathing as much as I did at nine, and lives a life sleeping under the stars alongside her scruffy companion, a mongrel-dog who sticks to her side like glue, but rarely listens to a word she says.

I have numerous rereads, edits, and concept art to complete before you will have a chance to get to know her as well as I do. But until that time comes, you can feel free to gaze at her picture (if you’re inclined to do that sort of thing) and try your best to see past the brim of her hat for hints of her unseen depths, and, as yet, unrevealed adventures.

Happy Robert Burns Day

January 25, 2013

2013 Celt

I wanted to wish everyone a Happy Robbie Burns Day!

I recently did a sketch of a striking Celtic wild woman as inspiration for a short story, and thought I would share it today. Also, it seemed like the best way to make my extremely simple post a little more interesting.

The Battle for Christmas

December 24, 2012

‘Twas the night before Christmas, when atop a small house

Old Dwarf Santa was warring, with a bitter cold louse.

The Battle for Christmas

In keeping with this month’s past dwarf-filled week, here is a dwarven warrior Santa Claus, engaged in an epic battle with the vicious Jack Frost atop a slick snow-covered roof, as he struggles to get his bag of weaponry to the chimney, not far off.

This picture is a pencil sketch which I colorized and partly shaded in Photoshop. The style is somewhat rough, but I’m satisfied with the result overall.

Now, if this is just a little too violent for you, here’s a charming Christmas post by my sister to clean your palate.

Merry Christmas, everyone!

2011. Dwarf Lass on Battlements

To conclude our Dwarf a Day week, surrounding the release of The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, I thought I would finish with a somewhat neglected member of dwarven society: the lady dwarf.

Shading each individual stone and finishing up all the details of her clothing, such as the Celtic knot work, beads and fur, actually took me several sessions off and on to fully complete, but I feel the result was well worth the effort. When I drew it I wanted to depict a dwarf maiden who was sturdy and tough, as well as feminine and beautiful, as this seems to be a rarity in the already scarce depictions of fantasy female dwarves.

The only beard you’ll find in this picture is the one on the axe.

2011. Standing Dwarf Warrior

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey opened at midnight last night, and as an ode to the book on which it was based, I thought I would post this sturdy fellow, who’s beard is tucked into his belt, much like the descriptions of many of the dwarves in the book.

I really enjoyed doing all the details on this one, and I quite like that his axe is actually somewhat small (for a fantasy dwarf, anyway) yet manages to look formidable all the same. Perhaps it’s the almost scythe-like pick on the back?

2011. Dwarf King

As dwellers of the mountains I often imagined dwarves having a fondness for furs and pelts in general, as the temperature high on the peaks where they make their homes would no doubt be bitterly cold.

The chain around this dignified dwarf’s neck is partly taken from the description of Thorin Oakenshield in The Hobbit, who I recall wore a gold chain around his neck as well.

Dwarf a Day: Well Kempt Dwarf

December 12, 2012

2011. Kempt Dwarf

For day four, we have this interesting character. He has a little bit of a gnome quality to him, but I think he might just be more of an intellectual dwarf. They can’t all be warriors after all.